Category: Luxe Hotels, Restaurants, Offices…


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Dirk Skreber <– is one of the leading contemporary German artists who currently lives and works in New York. Skreber has been exhibited in museum and institutions around the world and is represented in many of the world’s major collections.

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On a 6,000 square meter UK Pavilion site sits the Seed Cathedral carefully centered. The Seed Cathedral is 20 meters tall and is formed from 60,000 slender transparent fiber optic rods. Each fiber optic rod is 7.5 meters long and encloses one or more seeds at its tip. During the day, they draw daylight inwards to illuminate the interior. At night, light sources inside each rod allowing the entire structure to glow. When the wind blows the optic “hairs” gently move as they create a dynamic effect for the viewers. Inside the darkened inner chamber of the Seed Cathedral” the tips of the fiber optic filaments form an apparently hovering galaxy of slim vitrines containing a vast array of embedded seeds.” (via Yatzer)

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‘ Australian design firm Ashton Raggatt McDougall’s most recent projects have been to add a bit of functionality and uniqueness to the MTC Theater and the Melbourne Recital Centre in Australia. The results…absolutely incredible. The two buildings function individually but they connect together and sit on the same block as one another within the city’s art district. The MTC Theater features an interesting white facade comprised of white steel tubing in the form of geometric patterns that have the appearance of a 3d image when viewed at a certain angle. It was designed for optimal viewing at night and the tubes almost look luminescent. ‘

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EASTERN Design Office designed the Villa Saitan apartment building in Kyoto, Japan. From the main street we enter into a covert place along an alley of 4 meters in width. This construction is a collective housing consisting of 11 units. The impersonality of segmental housing complex is completely concealed in this architecture. Instead it is built to be seen as one big house. The architecture is covered with a wall in which holes are cut. The shape of the holes resembles a trunk, leaves, a root and bulbs. It also can be seen as clouds floating over the trees. Concrete shape which is based on nature turns into a hollow cave, light, and sunbeams filtered through trees. ‘

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Wonderwall designed this new concept flagship store adding a breath of fresh air to the more traditional image of Chocolatier Godiva. The shop features humorous design details such as the ‘melting chocolate’ ceiling combined with the primarily classical interior design. ‘ Link here.

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‘ The buildings in the town of Vercorin in the Swiss Alps contribute to an impressive piece by Felice Varini, called Cercle et suite d’éclats. The pattern was projected on the town from the vantage point, then traced and painted. Photographs from the same spot in daylight make the town look flat, almost like a postcard. What I’d like to know is how he got the town to go along with it; I could see an easily-repainted suburb in the States being convinced, but this quaint (and much older) town in Switzerland seems like a much bigger challenge.’ (via Make:)

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‘ Situated in Rijeka’s quarter Zamet, the new Zamet Centre in complete size of 16830 m2 hosts various facilities: sports hall with max 2380 seats, local community offices, library, 13 retail and service spaces and a garage with 250 parking spaces. One third of the sports hall’s volume is cut in the ground, and the rest of the Centre is fully fitted into the surrounding landscape. The building’s main architectural element are ribbon-like linear stripes stretching over the site in a north-south direction, functioning at the same time as an architectural design element of the object and as a zoning element which forms a public square and a link between the park on the north and school and B. Vidas street on the south. ‘

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Matchbox building is a 40 unit commercial building with 4.500m2 leasable space. The building will connect to and share facilities with an existing building in Amsterdam North. Conceived of as pre-fabricated units that are stacked one on top of the other. A central atrium garden carves open a space for natural light to filter in, thus allowing maximum use of the site, whereby units can also face inward. ‘

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The building is located in an historic area on the edge of Auckland’s (New Zealand) CBD. The front of the site addresses the high street which is dominated by a rich mixture of Victorian and Edwardian buildings. Most of these buildings have fallen into varying states of disrepair over recent decades. A strong contrast belies the urban condition of this high street against the parallel service street to the rear of the site. The back street is primarily a service lane and has remained largely undeveloped and unplanned through its evolution. Its streetscape is therefore architecturally unconsidered and haphazard in its appearance. (Continue..)

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‘ Movements and gestures of dancers are full of expression and tension. Dancers bring the fascinated viewer into an internal world of experience and emotion through the swinging movement of their hips, decorative arrangement of their fingers and smooth vibration of the ornamental frills. Rhythmic and dynamic music transmits the spectator into a world of incredible aesthetic feelings awakening all senses and inflaming the imagination. This is how architecture dedicated to the culture of feisty flamenco should look like as demonstrated in the proposal by MUS Architects. ‘ International School Museum of Flamenco in Spain (via ArchDaily)

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This impressive building known as the Nestlé Chocolate Museum has been designed by Metro Brazilian architects and is located beside a highway between Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, in Caçapava (about 110 km from Sao Paulo). One of the greatest things about this building is that its red glass windows located between the tunnel and the factory walls allows visitors to see chocolate being produced inside. This great structure is specially designed for public viewing and consist of two towers and an elevated runway, composed of steel and glass, spread over an area of 1850 sq m. The project is about offering the visitor an unique experience in the chocolate factory, so from now one the visitors will not be conducted on the ground like they used to be, but they will have the chance to take the tour on the high walkway that runs along the inside of the factory. Link here.

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Studio Nicoletti Associati have completed the Pod pavilion in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. In the area of Petaling Jaya, west of Kuala Lumpur, a great urban development is under way for the establishment of a new urban centre. As a landmark for this area, the Developer wanted to host his on-site offices and sale’s showroom in an iconic pavilion that would reflect the spirit and the architectural style of the whole development. Water droplets in nature was the inspiration for ‘The Pod’ pavilion structure creating a dynamic spherical form resulting in a primitive building archetype with a modern twist. The round and soft shape of The Pod is formed as a series of elliptical sections of variable widths and heights. Slithers of windows brings natural daylight into the spaces below.

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‘ Nothing happens for a reason ‘ at Logomo Café in Turku, Finland is a collaboration between Finnish design furniture manufacturer Artek and German artist Tobias Rehberger. (via Designboom)

 

‘ A tree hotel in the far north of Sweden, near the small village of Harads, close to the Arctic Circle. A shelter up in the trees; a lightweight aluminium structure hung around a tree trunk, a 4×4×4 meters box clad in mirrored glass. The exterior reflects the surroundings and the sky, creating a camouflaged refuge. The interior is all made of plywood and the windows give a 360 degree view of the surroundings. The construction also alludes to how man relates to nature, how we use high tech materials and products when exploring remote places in harsh climates (Gore-tex, Kevlar, composite materials, light weight tents etc). The functions included provide for a living for two people; a double bed, a small bath room, a living room and a roof terrace. Access to the cabin is by a rope bridge connected to the next tree. To prevent birds colliding with the reflective glass, a transparent ultraviolet colour is laminated into the glass panes which are visible for birds only. ‘ Link here.

 

Located on a peninsula between Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, Florida’s St. Petersburg – a city that has earned the nickname “God’s waiting room” for its popularity as a place of retirement – is perhaps not the first place you’d imagine much in the way of culture, let alone ground-breaking architecture. Yet, housing the largest collection of Salvador Dalí’s work outside of Europe, the newly opened Dalí Museum replaces the original 1982 museum with a breath-taking 68,000-square-foot structure that accommodates a priceless, 2,140-piece permanent collection of the Catalan surrealist’s work. Inspired by both his art and by a need to shelter the works from the severe hurricanes that so frequently threaten Florida’s west coast, architects HOK have created a stunning concrete block, from which an astonishing glass “Enigma” emanates, bulging with 1.5inch thick, triangulated glass panels. Surreal, innovative and utterly-compelling, HOK’s dramatic architectural delight is a fitting tribute to the eccentric works it houses… (via Weheart)